Project Description

We’ve all been itching for some travel lately, and where better to go than our very own Tasmania? While it may be Australia’s smallest state, Tasmania offers a true abundance of enriching experiences, making it an incredible vacation destination that should be on your bucket list.

Tasmania offers something for everyone, with a buzzing art scene, foodie opportunities galore and stunning natural scenery. For the outdoor lovers, Tassie is a magical place where you can experience remarkable natural beauty, with brooding mountains, beautiful beaches and what’s said to be the cleanest air in the world.

Still not sure if you should go? Half-price tickets might just twist your arm! To encourage Australians to take a holiday interstate while international borders remain restricted, last month the Australian Government  announced destinations across 13 regions in all of the states and territories to benefit from government subsidised airline tickets. Around 800,000 half-price airline tickets are being made available as part of a $1.2 billion tourism support package unveiled by the Federal Government. Discounted tickets can be purchased between the beginning of April and the end of July, for travel through until the end of September.

There are three locations in Tasmania included on the below flight paths – sounding good?

  • Launceston, Devonport and Burnie (Tasmania): Melbourne – Launceston
  • Launceston, Devonport and Burnie (Tasmania): Sydney – Launceston
  • Launceston, Devonport and Burnie (Tasmania): Brisbane – Launceston
  • Launceston, Devonport and Burnie (Tasmania): Melbourne – Devonport
  • Launceston, Devonport and Burnie (Tasmania): Melbourne – Burnie

Read on for our top tips for travelling in Tassie!

 

A culinary journey to be savoured

If fresh, artisanal food is your thing, you’re going to love exploring Tasmania’s culinary scene. Tasmania’s rich soil, pure air and clean water inspire dedicated growers to produce a truly authentic food and drink experience. Tasmania is a great place to learn about and try fresh produce. You can find it at farmers markets and in local eateries, from cheap and cheerful pubs to high-end bars and restaurants. You can even stop and buy from roadside stalls – in Tasmania you’ll still find honesty boxes all around the state.

Tasmania is also home to some of Australia’s leading cool climate wines with their pinot noir and sparkling wines attracting the interest of wine makers from around the world. Tassie’s clean, green environment is also ideal for producing cider, whisky and gin. You’ll find boutique breweries and distilleries showcasing their wares at cellar doors where you can sample the produce and talk to the maker.

Tasmania’s most visited attraction is the Salamanca Markets, on every Saturday in Hobart. Due to COVID restrictions, it’s currently running in an alternative format as Tasmania’s Own Market and still boasts over 220 stallholders from local growers, hot coffee, delicious lunch and breakfast options and beautiful handmade products and gifts. If you want to make a day of it, it’s just a short walk from the market up the historic Kelly’s Steps to the Georgian cottages and early maritime village atmosphere of Battery Point. In the same area, you’ll also find Hobart’s picturesque waterfront where you’ll see fishing boats berthed close to cruising yachts and even the occasional square-rigger or two.

 

Natural wonders abound

Tasmania is a treasure trove of natural wonders with stunning landscapes, unique animals and plants, and a rich diversity of sea life. Being a compact island, it’s easy to access its many different environments – from alpine ranges, wetlands and grasslands to coastal heaths and vast temperate rainforests.

A much-loved wilderness experience, even among locals, is Kunanyi/Mt Wellington, located just a 20-minute drive from Hobart. The 21-km drive to the summit passes through temperate rainforest to sub-alpine flora and glacial rock formations, ending in panoramic views of Hobart, Bruny Island, South Arm and the Tasman Peninsula.

You might know Oyster Bay wines already, but when you first set eyes on Great Oyster Bay set against the backdrop of Freycinet National Park and the three pink-granite peaks of the Hazards mountain range – you know you’re somewhere different. This is a visual experience to remember. Situated on Tasmania’s beautiful East Coast, Freycinet National Park occupies most of the Freycinet Peninsula. This long strip of land looks out to the Tasman Sea from the eastern side and back towards the Tasmanian coastline from the west.

And of course, it would be remiss of us not to mention one of the most-visited, and for good reason, places in Tasmania, Cradle Mountain. One of the most interesting places in the region, Cradle Mountain is part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. Located at the northern end of the Cradle Mountain – Lake St Clair National Park, Cradle Mountain is surrounded by glacial lakes, ancient rainforest, and unusual alpine vegetation. Cradle Mountain is also the starting point for the world-famous Overland Track, a magnificent six-day walk through the heart of some of the world’s finest mountain terrain.

 

Memorable arts and cultural experiences

You don’t have to travel far to find amazing arts and cultural experiences in Tasmania. There’s everything from small artist-run spaces to world class museums, cutting edge contemporary art galleries and festivals for almost every possible interest. This wealth of creativity comes from an active community of artists, designers and performers who are inspired by Tasmania’s natural environment.

The Museum of Old and New Art – MONA is Australia’s largest private museum and one of the most controversial private collections of modern art and antiquities in the world. Described by its owner as a “subversive adult Disneyland”, the collection includes everything from ancient Egyptian mummies to some of the world’s most infamous and thought-provoking contemporary art. With around 300 artworks on display, the collection takes up three floors within a subterranean architectural masterpiece and is guaranteed to impress.

Tasmania’s history tells a tale of a brutal convict past, maritime adventure, mining and early industrial development. Unlike most places, this rich cultural and built heritage is still well preserved today. The Port Arthur Historic Site is Australia’s most intact and evocative convict site and one of Australia’s great tourist attractions. Located on the Tasman Peninsula, the site has more than 30 buildings, ruins and restored period homes dating from the prison’s establishment in 1830 until its closure in 1877. During this time around 12,500 convicts served sentences and for many it was a living hell. It’s a sobering experience to visit and offers a unique opportunity to reflect on Australia’s past.